"Be proud of your place in the Cosmos. It is small, and yet, it is."

Cecil Palmer (via castielenelcielo)

"You’ve got to be prepared for the names they are going to call you compared to your male peers.…You will be a floozy and a slattern. He will be virile and a ladies’ man. You will be a freakshow, a retching wretch, a sloppy drunk. He will be charismatic, vainglorious, a ferocious drunk and Dionysian. You will be indiscriminate and desperate. He will be generous, tortured and driven. You will be so frail you may break at a mere wisp of wind. He will be alienated and agressive. You will be greedy and a control freak too… He will be in command, a cocksman, big-dicked, a genius… You will be “blonde ambition” or a tiny little child or a whore."

Courtney Love, Commenting to NME on the hypocritically differing attitudes towards male and female rockstars (via mariah-do-not-care-y)

"I do not desire mediocre love. I want to drown in someone."

shydeiac  (via saintofsass)j (via dynastylnoire)

"For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”"

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

Here’s a fun thing you learn when you study literature: the western canon is not universally beloved. Those books are not the Truth any more than the New York Post is skilled journalism. The main reason they’re held in such high esteem is because they were written by boring white dudes with rage fantasies and boring white dudes with rage fantasies also happen to be largely in charge of deciding which books are deemed classics and taught forever in the American school system.
So if your boyfriend tells you he loves Kerouac then you tell your boyfriend Kerouac was a fucking second rate hack who wrote Beat style because he didn’t have the skill or talent to write any other way, which is probably also why he just copied every adolescent male wanderlust story since the beginning of time. That shit’s derivative and boring.

(via saintthecla)

yesssssssss

(via alonethyme)

THANK YOU

(via littlecatlady)

the unbereable whiteness of “genius ” male writer … .it’s all bullshit ….when trend are influenced only. by whiteness

(via freshmouthgoddess)

"She was bored. She loved, had capacity to love, for love, to give and accept love. Only she tried twice and failed twice to find somebody not just strong enough to deserve it, earn it, match it, but even brave enough to accept it."

William Faulkner (via creatingaquietmind)

"None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives."

Jane Austen, Persuasion (via feellng)

"That’s the problem with putting others first; you’ve taught them you come second."

(via angiellehcim)

"Don’t ever compliment me by insulting other women. That’s not a compliment, it’s a competition none of us agreed to."

"Let go, or be dragged."

Zen Proverb  (via sadfag)

"Er — I don’t want to be rude or anything, but — this isn’t a great time for me to have a house-elf in my bedroom."

Harry Potter in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Check out our quotes section!

(via mugglenet)

"You alone are enough. You have nothing to prove to anybody."

Maya Angelou (via aworldofexperiences)

"American adults were eighth from the bottom in literacy, for instance. And recent college graduates look no better than older ones. Among people ages 16 to 29 with a bachelor’s degree or better, America ranks 16th out of 24 in numeracy. There is no reason to believe that American colleges are, on average, the best in the world. Instead, Piaac suggests that the wide disparities of knowledge and skill present among American schoolchildren are not ameliorated by higher education. If anything, they are magnified. In 2000, American 15-year-olds scored slightly above the international average. Twelve years later, Americans who were about 12 years older scored below the international average."

"Nothing kills you like your mind"

(via ceinel)

"I don’t know what they are called, the spaces between seconds– but I think of you always in those intervals."

Salvador Plascencia (via theantiquated)

"I just hope that one day—preferably when we’re both blind drunk—we can talk about it."

J.D. Salinger (via ontelbaar)