sapphrikah:

foxxxynegrodamus:

Quote via sunteaflower on tumblr.

SON. SOOOOONNNNNNNNNN.

sapphrikah:

foxxxynegrodamus:

Quote via sunteaflower on tumblr.

SON. SOOOOONNNNNNNNNN.

"Of all man’s instruments, the most wondrous, no doubt, is the book. The other instruments are extensions of his body. The microscope, the telescope, are extensions of his sight; the telephone is the extension of his voice; then we have the plow and the sword, extensions of the arm. But the book is something else altogether: the book is an extension of memory and imagination."

Jorge Luis Borges (via observando)

I don’t want other people to decide who I am. I want to decide that for myself. I want to avoid becoming too styled and too ‘done’ and too generic. You see people as they go through their career, and they just become more and more like everyone else.

"Someone calling a white person ‘wonder bread’ isn’t racist. It’s rude, but it’s not racist. Wonder bread as an offensive term has no weight, no meaning. It’s just something to push your buttons. Using the N-word is racist - it has meaning and weight and brings up a past that should’ve never happened. The comparison between rude and racist is like squares and rectangles - every square is a rectangle, but not every rectangle is a square. Every racist comment you hear is rude, but not every rude comment you hear is racist."

from an in-class debate about white supremacy (via seehowtame)

"Writers end up writing about their obsessions. Things that haunt them; things they can’t forget; stories they carry in their bodies waiting to be released"

Natalie Goldberg (via writingsforwinter)

"I love the rain. I love how it softens the outlines of things. The world becomes softly blurred, and I feel like I melt right into it."

Hanamoto HagumiHoney and Clover   (via owls-love-tea)

"Stop thinking about what everyone wants. Stop thinking about what I want, what your parents want. What do you want?"

The Notebook (via enigmatic-being)

"1:all fungi are edible.
2: some fungi are only edible once"

Terry Pratchett (via bableman)

"Do you remember the way the girls
would call out “love you!”
conveniently leaving out the “I”
as if they didn’t want to commit
to their own declarations.

I agree that the “I” is a pretty heavy concept."

David Berman, ”Self Portrait at 28” (via oofpoetry)

"Islam doesn’t promote violence or peace. Islam is just a religion and like every religion in the world, in depends on what you bring to it. If you’re a violent person, your Islam, your Judaism, your Christianity, your Hinduism is going to be violent. There are marauding Buddhist monks in Myanmar slaughtering women and children. Does Buddhism promote violence? Of course not. People are violent or peaceful, and that depends on their politics their social world, the way that they see their communities, the way they see themselves."

Religious scholar Reza Aslan answers CNN’s question, “Does Islam promote violence?” (via mediamattersforamerica)

"

When my youngest child started pointing at little boys in picture books, saying, “That’s me,” I was surprised. At first, we corrected her. “You’re a girl, but you can pretend to be this boy if you want to.” Then, after discussing it, we decided to take it at face value. We stopped correcting her. Yet I didn’t change pronouns or toss out dresses and pink shorts and other articles of clothing which were passed down from my older child.

If anyone was equipped to deal with a transgender child, it was us. When the time was right, we would change pronouns. We’d let him start hormone therapy as soon as he was ready. We would refinance the house to pay for top surgery. We would do almost anything to ensure that the transition was smooth.

When I cut Phoebe’s hair, I used clippers, using a YouTube tutorial as a guide. I left some length on top, skater boi style. The difference was pretty striking. She really did look like a boy. After the haircut, I noticed that I felt some loss around my perception of my child as female. I felt fear about how my child might be treated. My child attends a Montessori school filled with people who are like-minded in terms of empathy and rejecting cultural stereotypes, but kindergarten at a public school is only two years away. And what then?

That said, her hair looked adorable. The very next day, she wore her favorite sundress. After a few days, Shea pointed out that her sister’s old pictures didn’t look like her anymore. “Phoebe looks weird in pictures with long hair now,” she said. “I like her short hair better.” More importantly, so did Phoebe. She reveled in the fact that she no longer needed the tangles brushed out of her hair.

Strangers made comments like, “So why the short hair? Did her sister cut it?” They would give me a knowing look, as if to say, “I’ve been there!” Or this gem: “Did she have lice?” I shrugged and said, “She wanted it. And we all love it.” One stranger at the swimming pool asked why my son was wearing a girl’s swimsuit. I can understand people being curious, but the questions point to one thing — if your child deviates from gender norms, be ready to explain why.

The other day, when we were driving, Phoebe revealed that she didn’t want to wear “girls” clothes anymore. I asked her: “Tell me about the clothes you like. What kind of shirt do you want to wear?”

"Boys’ shirts."

"What does a boys’ shirt look like?"

"Blue. Black. With cars on it or dinosaurs or sharks."

"So you want a shirt with cars or dinosaurs on it. Maybe even a shark!"

"Yeah, and blue!"

We went to the thrift store that week. The boys and girls clothes were all on the same rack. She picked out a gray shirt with a red 1965 Mustang on it, and a brown Diego shirt. Some khaki shorts “like Daddy’s.” She couldn’t have been happier.

"

When Gender Norms Didn’t Work For My Kid | Erika Kleinman for the Huffington Post Gay Voices  (via gaywrites)

"

I realized why you’re not my cup of tea.

I drink coffee.

"

Melanie, Movielike (via perfect)

"

There are no Jack Kerouacs or Holden Caulfields for girls. Literary girls don’t take road-trips to find themselves; they take trips to find men.

"Great" books, as defined by the Western canon, didn’t contain female protagonists I could admire. In fact, they barely contained female protagonists at all.

"

"If only he could be alone in his room working, he thought, among his books. That was where he felt at his ease."

Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse (via wavingtovirginia)